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Evidence of Effectiveness
 
Evidence of Effectiveness
 

This is the abstract of our 2009 paper that reported the early (3-month follow-up) outcomes of our randomized clinical trial.

Eighty four heavy drinkers who responded to a newspaper recruitment ad were randomly assigned to receive either: a) training in a moderate drinking protocol via an Internet-based program ( www.moderatedrinking.com ) and use of the online resources of Moderation Management (MM) ( www.moderation.org ) or b) use of the online resources of MM alone. Follow-ups are being conducted at 3, 6, and 12 months. Results of the recently completed 3 month follow-up (86% follow-up) indicated both groups significantly reduced their drinking based on these variables: standard drinks per week; percent days abstinent; and mean estimated Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) per drinking day. Both groups also significantly reduced their alcohol-related problems. Relative to the control group the experimental group had better outcomes on percent days abstinent and log Drinks per Drinking Day. These short-term outcome data provide evidence for the effectiveness of both the moderate drinking web application and of the resources available online at MM in helping heavy drinkers reduce their drinking and alcohol-related problems.

Hester, Delaney, Campbell, & Handmaker, 2009. A web application for moderation training: Initial results of a randomized clinical trial. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 37, 266-276

This is the abstract of our 2011 paper in the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology that reports the full (3, 6, and 12-month follow-ups) outcomes of our randomized clinical trial.

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a web-based protocol, ModerateDrinking.com (MD) combined with use of the online resources of Moderation Management (MM) as opposed to the use of the online resources of MM alone. Method: We randomly assigned 80 problem drinkers to either the experimental or control group with follow-ups at 3, 6, and 12 months.

Results: Seventy-five participants (94%) had outcome data at 1 or more follow-up points, and 59 participants (73%) were assessed at all 3 follow-ups. Comparing baseline measures to the average outcomes at follow-ups indicated a significant overall reduction in both groups in alcohol-related problems and consumption variables. Compared with the control group, the experimental group had better outcomes on percent days abstinent. There was an interaction between intensity of drinking at baseline and treatment in determining outcomes assessing drinking. Less heavy drinkers in the experimental group had better outcomes on log mean blood alcohol content (BAC) per drinking day compared with the control group. Heavier drinkers did not differentially benefit from the MD program on this measure. Mixed model analyses in general corroborated these outcomes.

Conclusion: The outcome data provide partial evidence for the effectiveness of the MD web application combined with MM, compared with the effectiveness of the resources available online at MM by themselves.

Hester, R.K., Delaney, H.D., & Campbell, W. (2011). ModerateDrinking.com and Moderation Management: Outcomes of a randomized clinical trial with non-dependent problem drinkers. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 79, 215-224.